Saturday, December 5, 2009

6,000 Ft. Pole Shift Tsunami: The Highest Points In All 50 States

Greetings brethren and sistren. Welcome. You may have studied Patrick Geryl's theory, as modified and analyzed by Cliff High of Web-bot fame. I hope you did. It is terrible yes, but the science makes it a very strong case. Strong enough that it set me to wondering where the highest point in Ohio is. I also wondered exactly how high that Ohio high point actually is. As it turns out, Ohio's high point is not very high at all. If Patrick Geryl is correct in his theory, Ohio will be completely annihilated by a 6,000 foot wall of water. This led me to investigate the high points of neighboring states like Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Indiana and so on. The problem is, this entire mid-west region of the USA is just too dag-on low! So I had to look even farther out. I looked at all 48 continental states. Although Alaska has the highest point in the USA at 20,320 feet, it of course is not in the CONUS. And neither is Hawaii. There are other issues involved in Patriot Cave's search for a suitable high point. One must also consider fault lines, volcanoes, and nearby nuclear power plants. We'll get to those later. For right now let's find out the highest point in each of the 48 continental states.
Mt. Cheaha is Alabama's highest point at 2,405 feet. Arizona's highest point is Humphrey's Peak at 12,633 feet. Arkansas has Mt. Magazine at 2,753 feet. California has Mt. Whitney at 14,494 feet. Colorado has Mt. Elbert at 14, 433 feet. Connecticut's highest point is Mt. Frissell at 2,380 feet. Delaware's highest point is 448 feet. Patriots Cave is not telling you the exact location of that "high" point in Delaware because it's just not even close to being high enough. +++
The highest point in Florida is 345 feet above sea level. If you believe Patrick Geryl's theory or even similar cataclysmic flood theories, you will flee from Florida long before 12/21/2012. Georgia's highest point is Brasstown Bald at 4,784 feet. Idaho gets us up in the stratosphere at last, with it's Borah Peak, measuring in at a whopping 12,662 feet. Wow! +++++++ Illinois has Charles Mound, at 1,235 feet. Indiana has Hoosier Hill, at 1,257 feet. Iowa has Hawkeye Point, at 1,670 feet.
Kansas is home to Mount Sunflower, it's highest point, measuring in at a respectable 4,039 feet. Not bad. My neighbor to the south, good ol Kentucky, gets up there to 4,139 at it's Black Mountain. Louisiana's highest point is 535 feet at Driskill Mountain. Mt. Katahdin is Maine's highest point at 5,267 feet. Maryland has Mt. Backbone, standing tall at 3,360 feet.
Massachusetts has Mt. Greylock (very cool name, Mt. Greylock) at 3,487 feet. Michigan has Mt Arvon at 1,979 feet. Minnesota's highest point is Mt. Eagle at 2,301 feet. Mississippi's high point is 806 feet located at Woodall Mountain. I was surprised at this next one. I thought Missouri had higher mountains than this. The highest point in Missouri is at Taum Sauk Mountain, measuring in at 1,772 feet.
Montana boasts it's famous Granite Peak, towering at 12,799 feet. Holy Shimoli! +++ Nebraska surprised me, I did not know they had mountains this high. Nebraska's highest point is Panorama Point, at 5,424 feet. Nevada is very, very hard to beat with it's Boundary Peak breaking the clouds at 13,140 feet!
New Hampshire rates well for east coast options, with it's Mt. Washington at 6,288 feet. New Jersey's highest point is actually called "Highpoint", it stands at 1,803 feet. New Mexico ranks in with the big boys with Wheeler Peak, soaring to 13,161 feet. +++ New York has Mt. Marcy standing tall and looking good at a respectable 5,344 feet. You New Yorker's may want to "Map Quest" some driving directions so that you know how to get to Mt. Marcy if the need were to "arise" so to speak. +++ North Carolina ranks in as another fine east-coast option with it's Mt. Mitchell, measuring in at 6,684 feet.
North Dakota's highest point is White Butte at 3,506 feet. Alas, my home state of Ohio ranks among the worst options with our Campbell Hill, measuring in at a dismal 1,549 feet (hey we beat Florida, just not in college football). +++ The highest point in Oklahoma is Black Mesa at 4,973 feet. Oregon towers above most with it's famous Mt. Hood, measuring a whopping 11,239 feet!
Pennsylvania has Mt. Davis at 3,213 feet. Rhode Island has Jerimoth Hill at 812 feet. South Carolina has Sassafras Mountain, measuring 3,560 feet. +++ South Dakota is a viable option with it's Harney Peak at 7,242 feet. Tennessee suprised Patriots Cave with it's impressive Clingmans Dome, measuring 6,643 feet.
Texas is ranking higher and higher on my list of survivable locations within the CONUS. West Texas I'm telling you, clear a place for my family because we are working our way to you. Okay, back to the highest points. Texas, as I was saying, is home to Guadalupe Peak, standing tall at 8,749 feet. That peak is less than 90 minutes from the region in Texas I am looking at for our family's ancestral survival retreat property. Probably 2-3 day ride on horseback, I'm not sure. I welcome comments from Texans or anyone who is experienced with horses as to how long it takes to travel 100 or so miles across arid plains on horseback. Thank you.
Utah isn't embarrased by any state, with it's King's Peak, towering at 13,528 feet. Now THAT is getting up there. Vermont has Mt. Mansfield at 4,393 feet. Virginia boasts Mt. Rogers, at 5,729 feet. +++ Washington State ranks with the heavyweights, with it's awesome Mt. Rainier, dwarfing it's neighbors in the clouds at 14,410 feet. West Virginia has Spruce Knob at 4,861 feet. Wisconsin has Timm's Hill, at 1,951 feet. And finally, Wyoming ranks up their with the highest points in all of the CONUS with it's Gannett Peak, measuring in at a nose bleeding 13,804 feet.
Patriots Cave hopes it did not overlook anyone. In a future post we will examine locations based on other classifications, weaknesses and strengths, such as nuclear power-plants being close by, and proximity to fault lines. For Patriots Cave this is Joel the K signing out.

7 comments:

Gary said...

Hola Joel the K in your varied research have you any statistics just south of the border down Mexico way?
I am off the Sea of Cortez in Sonora.
Thanks for any info.

Mayberry said...

I can't really speak to riding times on horseback in that neck of the woods, but here is some info on the South Texas Trail Riders and their annual trek from Corpus to San Antonio, and many others. http://www.trailride.info/info.asp?StNum=45&Order1=02&TrNum=1440&Title=South+Texas+Trail+Riders+-+Corpus+Christi+to+San+Antonio+Ride These folks do have wagons going along as well, which slows things down a bit...

The terrain is a lot rougher out west, with less water available. Lots of rocky terrain, steep hills, ravines and such... I've been to Terlingua, Davis and Chisos mountains, Big Bend, etc. Been a while, but I remember it well.

Joel the K said...

Gary,
I will include Sonora,Mexico fro now on when I research locations. I have not done the work yet regarding fault lines, volcanoes and nuclear power plants. But you are in a fantastic location for totally survivable high points. Sonora is home to Cerro San Jose, at 8,678 feet. Sonora also has 2Cerro Pico Guacamayas at 8,681 feet. And Cerro las Flores (2 points -- observations indicate western peak higher)at 8,678 feet. I am jealous Gary. Do you have a blog? I would love to hear about adventures in Mexico. Thank you for your visit and comment and questions. I will include Sonora from now on.

Joel the K said...

May-B,
That is solid information. I appreciate that. Have you ever seen Guadalupe Peak? It's apx. 9,000 feet in elevation. Thanks May-B.

Mayberry said...

Yeah, I was there as a kid.

Anonymous said...

In my opinion it is obvious. I will refrain from comments.

Anonymous said...

I had a good time here but will return to google now.